LOW BACK PAIN

Low back pain (LBP) is the fifth most common reason for physiotherapy

visits, which affects nearly 60-80% of people.

Most often the low back pain is non-specific. Low back pain that lasts for

more than 3 months is known as chronic low back pain.

MOST COMMON CAUSES OF BACK PAIN:

  1. Muscle or ligament strain. Repeated heavy lifting or a sudden awkward

movement can strain back muscles and spinal ligaments. If you are in poor

physical condition, constant strain on your back can cause painful muscle

spasms.

2. Bulging or ruptured disks. Disks act as cushions between the bones

(vertebrae) in your spine. The soft material inside a disk can bulge or rupture

and press on a nerve.

3. Arthritis. Osteoarthritis can affect the lower back. In some cases, arthritis

in the spine can lead to a narrowing of the space around the spinal cord, a

condition called spinal stenosis.

4. Skeletal irregularities. A condition in which your spine curves to the side

(scoliosis), can also lead to back pain, but generally not until middle age.

5. Osteoporosis. Your spine’s vertebrae can develop compression fractures if

your bones become porous and brittle with age.

RISK FACTORS:

Anyone can develop back pain, even children and teens. The following factors might put

you at greater risk of developing back pain:

  1. Age. Back pain is more common as you get older, starting around age 30 or

40.

2. Lack of exercise. Weak, unused muscles in your back and abdomen might

lead to back pain.

3. Excess weight. Excess body weight puts extra compression through the spine.

4. Diseases. Some types of arthritis and cancer can contribute to back pain.

5. Improper lifting. Using your back instead of your legs and abdominal muscles when lifting

can lead to back pain.

6. Psychological conditions. People prone to depression and anxiety

appear to have a greater risk of back pain typically due to increased muscle tension.

7. Smoking. This reduces blood flow to the lower spine, which can impact the proper delivery of

nutrients to the disks in your back. Smoking also slows healing.

ARE YOU FEELING ANY OF THESES SYMPTOMS?

Back pain can present in variety of ways:

1. Dull achy and nagging pain in the back, buttocks and legs

2. Sharp, shooting, burning pain in the back and legs

3. Stiffness in the back

4. Heaviness in one or both legs

5. Tingling and numbness in one or both legs and feet

6. Sensory alterations in one or both legs.

7. Weakness in one or both legs.

8. Difficulty with twisting and turning in bed, getting in and out of a

chair, and bending down. Sometimes even walking and stairs can be limited.

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU AT LEDREW PROFESSIONAL SPORTS

MEDICINE CLINIC:

To keep your back healthy and strong:

1. Exercise. Talk with your physiotherapist at LeDrew Professional

about what kind of exercises and activities are best suited for your back.

Regular low-impact aerobic activities — those that don’t strain or jolt your

back — can increase strength and endurance and allow your

muscles to function more optimally.

2. Build muscle strength and flexibility. Specific abdominal and back

muscle exercises, which strengthen your core, help condition these muscles

so that they work together like a natural corset for your back. Your

therapist can suggest which specific exercises are right for you.

3. Maintain a healthy weight. Being overweight may strains back muscle and cause spinal compression. If

you are overweight, cardiovascular exercises can help you trim down and prevent back pain.

4. Ask your Physiotherapist or Athletic Therapist what posture’s can help your back.

Use your body properly: Stand smart. Sit smart. Lift smart.